Back to Basics

Margaret Waters, the JWPA president’s long suffering wife, mentioned that at least two of the three  regular readers of my column keep asking for some “basic” computer advice. You know, things like how  to cut and paste, save a file, get on the Internet… 
That reminded me of a book, popular some time ago: “Windows for Dummies”. A patronising title, to be  sure; it also re-enforced the habit of computer experts to view people with no computer skills as, well ‐  Dummies!  I don’t know about you, but I always learned better from teachers who didn’t make me feel  stupid. 
But I digress. For a book purported to teach “the basics” to computer dummies, it was quite a whopper.  Little chance then trying to convey computer basics within the confines of this little column. But don’t  despair, I will add some links to websites with all the “basic stuff” you could ever wish to know. 
Let me try instead to convince you that improving your computer skills is a worthwhile pursuit. 
 A computer is, of course, just a tool. But unlike a hammer used to drive in a nail, a computer is more like  the ultimate Swiss Army Knife; capable of doing a multitude of things, even simultaneously. I won’t bore  you with a list of things a computer can do. Everybody can name at least three. Four, if you include  “annoying the hell out of me” in your list! 
In 1812, the British government held a mass trial against the “Luddites”, a group of textile workers who,  opposing the introduction of mechanised looms, had taken to destroying these threats to their way of  life. As was the habit in those days, many were executed or transported. 
Luckily, we have moved on a bit, at least in Australia. Being a Neo‐Luddite in today’s “connected” world  wont get you killed but it sure is hard work. You could use the Encyclopaedia Britannica to check if I’ve  gotten my facts right, of course; but I used Wikipedia on the Internet to spare myself embarrassment in  case I got it wrong. It took less than ten seconds! Mind you, given Wikipedia’s “open slather” policy of  allowing anybody to add content, you may have to verify the information elsewhere before you bet your  life on it.   
Ok then, what about email? Now, there is a labour saving method of communicating. It beats writing  (and posting) a letter any day. I get at least fifty emails a day. Unfortunately, forty are usually spam and  five are rude and/or racist jokes from my friends. The spam emails are mostly about penis enlargement:  I ask you, HOW do they know? 
Maybe I am not careful enough about online privacy. Apparently, they can “see” anything stored on  your computer. This is freaking me out, because I am doing my banking online. Does this mean “they”  can see by how much my account is overdrawn? Still, I’d rather poke a hot needle in my eye than going  back to writing cheques or paying my bills at the post office.  
One reason my account is constantly overdrawn is, naturally, eBay. Not a day goes buy that I don’t buy  something “essential” at this online super store. The item is usually hard to find elsewhere and/or costs 
a fraction of what I’d have to pay in the shops. To keep the missus happy, I bought her an Amazon  Kindle, so she can read on the train without lugging books around. The very next day I heard on the  news that a major book store had gone bust. Apparently, they couldn’t compete against online  bookstores – oops! 
Hello, what’s that funny ticking noise coming from my computer? It’s never done that before! Maybe I  should save this article before I loose…  
That’s it – I’m going fishing! Don’t bother calling, I am NOT taking my iPhone!